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How to get 3D at home without spending much or buying a new tv

I fell in love with 3D back in the late 80's to early 90's upon landing in a seat at Disney World and watching the Michael Jackson experience. It was my first taste of 3D and it was ahead of it's time, like ten years ahead of it's time. The eye popping visuals and the feeling of being immersed into this video world was flat out amazing. Over the next decade or so I experience 3D gradually at game locations that offered VR games, it was to say the least an all new experience. Consumer end 3D has never been cheap, getting the same results as you  would in lets say a multimillion dollar 3D theater from the comfort of your couch is a very expensive task.

Most people I have heard complain about 3D mostly do so for two reasons. One, the glasses they aren't designed specifically for one user and they are mostly one size fits all. Second, motion sickness that makes individuals feel like they need to find the nearest bathroom. There various formats for 3D video, the most commonly known one is Anaglyph 3D. It's the 3D that you see while wearing often disposable glasses with one red and one blue lens. This version of 3D could easily be found in cereal boxes for Saturday morning cartoon stuff. This version of 3D works well because it's a cheap version of coming the content without spending much money. Stereoscopic 3D is mostly based around solid frames that either use polarized lenses, shutter glasses, or a variation of the old Anaglyph styled lens but with darker shades.  The difference between those 3 are price, usage, and comfort with the viewer. Polarized and Shutter glasses are more commonly on the expensive end because they come associated with direct television sets. Shutter glasses in particular require battery charging as they are motorized shutting off one lens at a time giving you more of a pop out in your face 3D experience or about as close as one can get to movie theater type quality. The anaglyph modern version approach is the easiest and cheapest way of consuming 3D content but you don't get things jumping out of the screen and are less likely to experience motion sickness.

I recently searched for a solution to get 3D as inexpensively as I could. After many searches, read reviews, and consumer reports I found one particular item on amazon that caught my interest. It was a box that promised to convert 2D content to 3D, that wasn't it's only promise but it was an attractive one. 2D to 3D conversion is possible on some modern television sets but most don't actually handle it well, this box didn't do it well at all. The other features it provides were as promised, I could watch SBS (side by side) 3D from HBO on demand. The box is called "3D Video Wizard console" and can be found on amazon and other sites for under $35. The experience takes a bit of getting used to as I don't normally wear glasses, the sensation of having them on my nose really distracted me. The more time I spent using them the more comfortable they became. I enjoyed several animated movies which looked wonderful via the glasses, but it wasn't an all enveloping experience. I then grabbed a pair of wireless headphones, put on a copy of avatar 3D, and sat back to watch it in 3D. I was absolutely blown away, these glasses work amazingly better with Bluray 3D. The depth layers of 3D were nothing short of dazzling, the forest scenes in Avatar completely left me flabbergasted. Gravity not so much, perhaps i'll write about that one. To end this post I will say, don't expect the same 3D experience as a $1000 native 3D television may provide but this device gets me pretty close to that experience.

 


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